A study commissioned by YES Montreal and funded by the CHSSN reveals that depression, stress, and low self-esteem create vicious cycle for unemployed youth 2013-11-25

According to a new report commissioned by YES Montreal and funded by the CHSSN (Community Health and Social Services Network), prolonged unemployment creates depression, stress and low self esteem, which can be reversed in most cases with proper support.

 
Advisory Council
Lionel Blanshay
Rob Braide
Scott Conrod
Charles B. Crawford
John W. Dobson*
Peter R. Johnson
Guy Laframboise
Timothy Leyne
Peter McAuslan
Andy Nulman
Philip O'Brien
Hilary Radley
Herschel Segal
Robert Walsh

 
Board of Directors

Past President, YES
Harold Simpkins
John Molson School of Business
Concordia University

President, YES
John Aylen
John Aylen Communications

Vice President, YES
Jordan LeBel, Ph.D.
John Molson School of Business
Concordia University


Vice President, YES
Roslyn Slawner
Hart Resource Development

Treasurer, YES
Gavin Correa, CPA, CA, CFP
Litwin Correa, LLP
Chartered Accountants

Secretary, YES
Doris Juergens
NATIONAL Public Relations

Andrew Abdalla
MNP LLP

John Scott Bailey
JSB & Associates Inc.

Pino Di Ioia
BeaverTails Pastry/Moozoo Juices
Gelateria

Chris Emergui
BAM Strategy

Harvey Elman
Landmark Properties Inc.

Christopher Minkoff
Fort Financial Group



Iris Unger
Executive Director




 
 
 
PRESS RELEASE                                                           For Immediate Release
 
Depression, stress, and low self-esteem create vicious cycle for unemployed youth

 
Montreal, November 25, 2013 -- According to a new report commissioned by YES Montreal and funded by the CHSSN (Community Health and Social Services Network), prolonged unemployment creates depression, stress and low self esteem, which can be reversed in most cases with proper support.
 
“For the past several years, we have observed that our clients have been exhibiting more depression, stress, and low self esteem as a result of unemployment and underemployment,” said Iris Unger, Executive Director of YES Montreal. “These issues were themselves creating a barrier to their being able to get employment.”
 
Unger stresses that in most cases the mental health issues are situational and with a bit of support--not necessarily from institutions or hospitals--people can move forward.
 
These findings and others are contained in a report entitled “Building Youth Resiliency and Community Vitality within Montreal’s English Language Population” which was revealed at a press conference Monday, November 25 and will be available at www.yesmontreal.ca. The report details the challenges faced by youth entering the job market, the specific challenges of Quebec’s English-speaking minority, and recommendations from YES Montreal based on its own experience in providing front-line services to English-speaking youth.
 
“Unemployment can have a scarring effect for the youth,” said Dr. Joanne Pocock, a Research Consultant for the CHSSN who authored the report. “Right at the time a person is expecting to transition from school or training to work, extended unemployment can have long-lasting and traumatic effects. An unemployed person is more likely to experience symptoms of poor mental health such as anxiety, psychological distress and depression than someone who is employed.”
 
The report compiled data through an internet-based survey, key informant interviews and a statistical profile of English-speaking youth in the greater Montreal area.

 
The report provides evidence that this is an increasingly important issue and resources that could help in preventing major mental issues are not adequate to meet the needs. According to surveys from the Institut de la statistique du Québec, English-speaking respondents display a greater prevalence of mental health problems (7 percent) compared to French-speaking respondents (4.4 percent) and are more than twice as likely to perceive their mental health as poor.
 
In 2009, YES Montreal launched small group sessions for clients experiencing psychological distress, which addresses transition-related socio-emotional challenges through a peer-to-peer format. The sessions have proven to help our clients to move forward in the employment process, resulting in a significantly greater success rate in securing employment.
 
“We think our approach is working,” said Ms. Unger. “We hope this report will move the governments and agencies working in mental health, youth and employment to work together to develop preventative measures that would result in longterm benefits to the individuals and ultimately, the economy and health care system.

 
   


About YES Montreal
As a not-for-profit organization, YES Montreal (Youth Employment Services) enriches the community by providing English-language support services to help Quebecers find employment and start businesses. The YES Montreal Women In Technology Program provides services geared to women interested in pursuing a career in technology or who want to start a technology-based business.
 
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Media Contact:
Catherine Brisindi
Director of Marketing and Special Events
YES (Youth Employment Services)
Tel. 514-878-9788 Ext. 322
E-mail:
cbrisindi@yesmontreal.ca


Iris Unger
Executive Director
YES (Youth Employment Services)
Tel. 514-878-9788 Ext. 301
E-mail:
iu@yesmontreal.ca

 

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